Thursday, April 8, 2010

It Is NOT A Small World

I thought I would try giving a greater impression of my world map, by shrinking the original segments and  joining them together - hopefully to display the overall image, which I have not in fact seen myself.

Wanting it to be large enough to thoroughly grasp the overall detail was, however, less that satisfactory ... I weep, for I haven't a computer - nor a program - powerful enough to save the complete file.  Even this, below, which represents only 12 of the map segments I've created (there are over sixty in total), and the computer screeched at me: too big! too big!

Nevertheless. This is the largest I could make this chunk.  I think it gives a sense of the scale of the actual Earth.  It is not a small world.

I decided to include those parts of my map which are in the process of being created - I thought this might help demonstrate that things are always in progress, always moving forward.  The work I do on my world is never static.

11 comments:

Elton said...

Well, given that the world itself is like, what: 24,901.55 miles around it's equatorial circumference it's not a small, small world.

Alexis said...

Elton, the title was a reference to a very common phrase, perhaps you've heard it: "It's a small world after all"...? I always hated that saying. Alas if the title seemed obvious, and not clever.

Andrej said...

Cleverness and/ or obviousness aside... looking at 20% of your world I am awed and mystified.

Chgowiz said...

Fucking amazing.

PatrickW said...

That is very cool. I look forward to the day that computers will have the power to view the full map.

Technical question: The pink hexes on the western sheet clearly marks out the British Isles. What do the pink hexes in the east mark out? (I'm guessing mountainous terrain.)

I really can't say it enough - thank you for posting your maps. They are very inspirational.

Alexis said...

I meant to say this earlier: I have marked those parts of the map that are land, and which need to be done, in pink. Pink is a color that doesn't appear anywhere else on the map, you see. The areas will look different when there is a coastline (every island, for instance, would be represented by a pink hex beforehand).

Those pink areas on the east show those inhabited places in the Lena Basin, generally refered to as Yakutsk. The central areas, which are surrounded by parts of the map which have been done, are the Yenisey Basin ... which I have yet to finish.

Oddbit said...

Suddenly I would like to see it all lain out on a football field too...

Symeon Kokolas said...

I'd take it mapped onto the form of a 1-meter diameter globe. Big enough to be able to read everything and see the level of detail. Maybe coat it in something so you could use whiteboard marker on it safely, too.

Elton said...

Yes, I got the song part. But you didn't come across exactly as "clever" in how you described what was going on. :)

PatrickW said...

@Alexis: Thank you for the clarification on the eastern pink hexes.

Pcount Sigils said...

Alexis,

http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/arxiv/25126/?ref=rss - "Europe's Plan to Simulate the Entire Planet" - seems that the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich is just a couple decades behind you.

Seriously, you might have something to offer them.